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6 Minute English

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Source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/6-minute-english ADDITIONAL INFORMATION Install the Replay buttons on card add-on to add audio button on the card. Only the first few cards contains audio files. Audio for the rest of the deck can be downloaded from mega.nz. This is a sample deck. For more information, please see "My Other Anki Decks" section on the Essential Idioms in English page. Nickolay <kelciour@gmail.com>

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ID 170810
Date 10 August 2017
Title Fancy dress funerals
Image
Description Have you ever thought about what sort of funeral you would like to have?
Audio
Summary Funerals are sad occasions but some people decide to turn them into joyful celebrations of the dead person's life. Rob and Neil talk about fancy dress funerals and teach you six items of useful vocabulary in this episode of 6 Minute English.
Question According to a UK survey, how many of us would like our funerals to be more of a party or celebration? Is it… a) 5%, b) 25% or c) 50%? Listen to the programme to find out the answer.
Vocabulary funerala ceremony we hold for a dead personceremonya formal event performed on special occasions – like a wedding, a graduation or a funeralfancy dressspecial clothes you wear to an event to look like a famous person or character from a movie, for examplecostumea set of clothes you wear to look like somebody elseto go all outto make a big effortto get carried away(phrasal verb) to get very excited and lose control of your feelings
Transcript Note: This is not a word-for-word transcript NeilHello, I'm Neil and welcome to 6 Minute English, where today we bring you a serious topic and six items of vocabulary. RobAnd hello, I'm Rob. Now, here's a serious question for you, Neil. Have you thought about what you'd like to happen when you die? NeilInteresting way to start the show, Rob… No, I haven't. RobWell, nobody really likes to talk about death, do they? NeilWell, it isn't a fun topic. So, can we talk about something else, please? RobAfraid not. Because today's topic is funerals – a funeral is a ceremony we hold for a dead person. NeilAnd a ceremony is a formal event performed on special occasions – like a wedding or a graduation – or in this case, a funeral. RobOK. Well, let's start with a quiz question. According to a UK survey, how many of us would like our funerals to be more of a party or celebration? Is it…a) 5%,b) 25% orc) 50%? NeilWell, I think it's 25%. I hadn't thought about it before – but I'd definitely prefer my funeral to be a celebration. With my favourite music playing – and definitely nobody wearing black… RobWell, strangely enough, a friend of mine went to a funeral recently where the funeral director was dressed as Darth Vader from Star Wars! NeilHmm. That sounds wrong. But I guess people are choosing to move away from the traditional funeral – you know, in church, people dressed in black, all very quiet… RobDarth Vader does wear black, at least! Anyway, let's hear from Shonnie Sullivan here in the UK talking about the fancy dress funeral she and her sister organized for their mother. INSERTShonnie: It was quite unusual as we turned up in fancy dress.Interviewer: Had your mum left instructions about how she wanted her funeral to be?Shonnie:Only that we don't cry, and we… to have a party to celebrate her life. Be happy, don't be sad… I was a witch.Interviewer: How did you look?Shonnie: Oh, it was just a little black dress and I just had, like, a little fancy witch hat on – the same as my sister. And we had a very close friend of the family come as Beetlejuice – which was absolutely amazing. He really did go all out for that. RobSo fancy dress - special clothes you wear to an event – to look like a famous person or character from a movie. Another word we use is costume – which is a set of clothes you wear to look like somebody else. NeilShonnie and her sister chose a Halloween theme for the funeral and wore witches' costumes – little black dresses with special hats. RobA close family relative dressed as Beetlejuice … Did he dress as a squashed insect, Neil? I'm confused here! NeilNo, Rob. He dressed as Beetlejuice, the main character in a popular 1980s movie. Beetlejuice is a ghost who wears crazy clothes, and has scary hair and make up. RobHmm. I haven't seen the film. But what does Shonnie mean when she says her relative went ‘all out' with his costume? NeilTo go all out means to make a big effort – and this guy's costume involved not only special clothes, but special hair and make up too. RobLike me. NeilWhat do you mean, 'like me'? RobWell, I go all out to get my clothes and hair just right for 6 Minute English. NeilYes, and, well... you look great, Rob. But unfortunately nobody sees us… do they? RobYes, good point. But it's important to make an effort. NeilSo have you had any thoughts about the sort of funeral you would like to have? RobOooh… Yes, I like the thought of my friends and family saying their final goodbyes to me on a beach with a beautiful sunset, listening to Stairway to Heaven by Led Zeppelin… NeilOK, well, before you get too carried away with ideas for your own funeral, let's have the answer to today's quiz question. RobTo get carried away means to get very excited and lose control of your feelings! I never thought I would get excited about my own funeral… But anyway – yes, back to today's question! How many of us would like our funerals to be more of a party or celebration? Is it… a) 5%, b) 25%, or c) 50%? NeilAnd I said 25%. RobNo, it's actually 50%. The market research company ICN found that half of us here in the UK would prefer something different to the traditional funeral. NeilMore than I expected.OK, shall we look back at the words we have learned today? RobYes. First up – 'funeral' – a ceremony we hold for a dead person. The plural is funerals – "Fancy dress funerals aren't everybody's cup of tea." The adjective is – funereal – notice the stress on the second syllable – "Who chose this funereal music? Can we change it to something more cheerful?" Neil'Not my cup of tea' by the way, is something you don't enjoy doing. RobOK – 'ceremony' – a formal event performed on special occasions. Neil"I didn't go to my sister's graduation ceremony." Rob"In the UK, the opening of Parliament is a ceremonious occasion." Ceremonious is the adjective. NeilNumber three – 'fancy dress' is special clothing you wear to an event – for example, to look like a famous person or character from a movie. Rob"I've been invited to a fancy dress party." NeilWho are you going to go as, Rob? RobIt's a secret, Neil! NeilNumber four – ‘costume' – a set of clothes you wear to look like somebody else. "Rob is going to go to the fancy-dress party in a Superman costume." RobGood guess. Right. Number five – 'to go all out' means to make a big effort. Neil"We went all out this year with our Christmas decorations – with a life-size flashing Santa Claus and sleigh." RobWay to go, Neil! Number six – the phrasal verb 'to get carried away' – means to get very excited and lose control of your feelings! Neil"She got carried away and painted the whole house pink." RobThat must be Barbie's house… NeilYup – and fancy dress is definitely Barbie's cup of tea! OK, that's all for today. But please remember to check out our Instagram, Twitter, Facebook and YouTube pages. RobOK. Bye-bye! NeilGoodbye!
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ID 170817
Date 17 August 2017
Title What makes a video go viral?
Image
Description Rob and Neil discuss what makes people want to share a video
Audio
Summary Rob is keen to share funny videos - he loves cat ones. Neil is not interested. What makes people want to share them? Listen to the programme.
Question Which was one of the first videos to go viral on the internet? Was it… a) Charlie Bit my Finger, b) Sneezing Panda or c) Dancing Baby? Listen to the programme to find out the answer.
Vocabulary memea picture or video with an amusing caption that a lot of people share with each other onlinegrumpybad tempered!goes viralwhen something (e.g. a video or picture) gets passed on very quickly from person to person on the internetpeerspeople the same age as ourselves who share the same social position in a grouparousal (to arouse)to excite a particular feeling in somebodyto fire someone upto make someone excited and enthusiastic about something
Transcript Note: This is not a word-for-word transcript NeilHello. I'm Neil. Welcome to 6 Minute English, where we like to share… RobJokes, funny stories and cat videos… NeilNo, Rob – we like to share six useful items of vocabulary. RobYes, that too. But first, check out this meme on my phone, Neil – Grumpy Cat – it's so cute! Shall I send it to you? NeilNo, please don't! A meme is a picture or video with an amusing caption that a lot of people share with each other online. Well, in this programme we're talking about why some online content goes viral… Rob… and some doesn't. This cat is cute because it looks so grumpy – and that means 'bad tempered'. NeilAn image, video, or other piece of information goes viral when it gets passed on very quickly from person to person on the internet. RobSo first let's start with our quiz question, Neil. Can you tell me which was one of the first videos to go viral on the internet? Was it…a) Charlie bit my finger,b) Sneezing Panda orc) Dancing Baby? NeilI'm going to guess 'Sneezing Panda' – because I haven't seen any of those videos. RobThat's ridiculous Neil. Have you been living under a rock? NeilLook, I just don't find silly videos particularly cute – or funny. RobOK, OK, no need to get grumpy about it. Let's move on. Why do so many people – Neil excluded – enjoy sharing content online? Let's listen to Dr Jonah Berger, Marketing Professor at the University of Pennsylvania and author of Contagious: Why things catch on, talking about what motivates us to share. INSERTDr Jonah Berger, Marketing Professor at the University of Pennsylvania and authorHumans are social animals. Sharing allows us (to) feel connected to others. We share emotions, which allow us to deepen the bonds we have with our peers and with our friends. NeilSo it's all about being connected and deepening the bonds between ourselves and our peers. Our peers are people the same age as ourselves who share the same social position in a group. RobAnd we particularly like to share content that makes us feel emotional. Let's hear more from Dr Jonah Berger about this. INSERTDr Jonah Berger, Marketing Professor at the University of Pennsylvania and authorHigh arousal emotions include things like anger and anxiety, but also excitement and humour, low arousal – sadness and contentment. [It] turns out that those high-arousal emotions – those emotions that fire us up and cause us to take action – also drive us to share. NeilArousal means 'to excite a particular feeling in somebody'. And emotions like anger and anxiety tend to cause stronger feelings than sadness and contentment. RobRight – high-arousal emotions fire us up – and to fire someone up means 'to make someone excited and enthusiastic about something'. So when a video we see on the internet makes us laugh – or makes us excited or angry – then we are more likely to share it with others. NeilAnd sharing that emotion with others strengthens the connection or bond between us. That's what Dr Berger's theory says anyway. RobI'm surprised that sad things aren't passed on as much as, say, funny things. NeilWell, how often do you share sad videos with your peers? RobGood point. I do tend to share content that makes me laugh – more than sad or angry stuff anyway. Like the Grumpy Cat meme. Can I show it to you now? NeilNo. RobOK. I'll just show you the caption. It says, "I purred once. It was terrible". NeilYeah. Right. Hilarious, Rob. Now, can we have the answer to today's quiz question, please, if you've finished amusing yourself? RobOK. OK. Which was one of the first videos to go viral on the internet? Was it… a) Charlie Bit my Finger, b) Sneezing Panda or c) Dancing Baby? NeilAnd I said 'Sneezing Panda'. RobWell, it was actually Dancing Baby. This 3-dimensional animation of a baby dancing the cha-cha was one of the first viral videos released in the late 1990s. Another popular one was the Hamster Dance by Hampton the Hamster, which appeared in 1997. NeilWell, fascinating as all that sounds, shall we look back at the words we learned today, Rob?RobSure. The first item was 'meme' – a picture or video with an amusing caption that a lot of people share with each other online. For example, "I tried to show Neil a hilarious meme about a grumpy cat." NeilThe word 'meme' was actually invented by evolutionary biologist Professor Richard Dawkins to represent an idea or concept that spreads in human culture in a similar way to a gene. RobFascinating. That sounds way too complicated, Neil. Let's move on to item number two – 'grumpy' – I gave one example just now. But here's another one: "He's the grumpiest man I've ever met." NeilI hope you're not talking about me, Rob. Number three – 'to go viral' – means 'an image, video, or other piece of information that gets passed on very quickly from person to person on the Internet'. For example, "What makes a video go viral?" RobI don't know, Neil – If I knew how to make a viral video, I'd be a rich man by now! NeilBefore computers and the internet we only talked about viral infections, didn't we? "I've got a nasty viral infection so I'm not coming into work today." RobYeah, that's right. The connection is that both viral infections and viral memes spread quickly! NeilOK – number four. 'Peers' are people the same age as our selves who share the same social position in a group. RobFor example, "Teenagers often worry about looking silly in front of their peers." Next up – arousal – that means 'to excite a particular feeling in somebody'. NeilWe heard about high and low-arousal emotions. The verb is 'to arouse'. For example, "The debate aroused strong feelings on both sides." RobOK, finally – 'to fire someone up' means 'to make someone excited and enthusiastic about something'. "I'm really fired up about today's vocabulary!" NeilGood to know, Rob. But it's time to go now, but please check out our Instagram, Twitter, Facebook and YouTube pages. RobBye-bye! NeilGoodbye! RobShall we watch that 'dancing baby' now, Neil? NeilNo.
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ID 170803
Date 03 August 2017
Title It's good to talk
Image
Description The treatments that help people stay mentally healthy
Audio
Summary Do you feel very anxious or depressed sometimes? Talking to a professional can help. Neil and Rob talk about talk therapy and teach you six items of useful vocabulary in this episode of 6 Minute English.
Question Who invented the first talk therapy? Was it… a) Boris Karloff, b) Carl Jung or c) Sigmund Freud? Listen to the programme to find out the answer.
Vocabulary therapya type of treatment for a problem or illnesspsychological problemsproblems of the minddisturbednot thinking or behaving in a normal way because of psychological problemsdepressiona feeling of unhappiness that can affect your thoughts, behaviour, and feelingsmarkedobvious or noticeableinterventionsomething you do to improve a medical problem (in this context, it refers to different types of talk therapy)
Transcript Note: This is not a word-for-word transcript NeilWelcome to 6 Minute English, where we bring you a thoughtful topic and six items of vocabulary. RobI'm Rob… NeilAnd I'm Neil. So I was watching an old Woody Allen movie last night… RobOK. Is he the anxious middle-aged guy from New York who talks about his problems all the time?NeilThat's the one. He was paying for… psychoanalysis – and that's a type of talk therapy that was popular in the 1970s. Do you know what therapy means, Rob? RobYes. Therapy means a type of treatment for a problem or illness. And talk therapy is a treatment for psychological problems – which means problems of the mind – in case you were struggling with another long Greek word, Neil! Trained therapists work with you on ways to understand your thoughts, feelings and behaviour. NeilHey, Rob, I'm an expert on long Greek words. Psychology is the noun, by the way. And the prefix 'psycho' in front of any word means 'to do with the mind'. RobFor example the horror movie Psycho… which is all about the disturbed mind of the main character, Norman Bates… Neil…Where disturbed means not thinking or behaving in a normal way – because you have psychological problems. Norman Bates would have found talk therapy helpful, don't you think? RobHmm. I'm not sure really. Anyway, let's have a quiz question – shall we now, Neil? Can you tell me who invented the first talk therapy? Was it… a) Boris Karloff,b) Carl Jung orc) Sigmund Freud? NeilI'm going to go for Sigmund Freud. RobOK. Interesting answer – we'll find out later whether it was the right one or not. Now, moving on, what do you think is the most common psychological problem today, Neil? NeilIt's depression. And depression – a feeling of unhappiness that can affect your thoughts, behaviour, and feelings – is the most common psychological problem affecting people throughout the world. RobHow depressing! That's the adjective! It makes me feel depressed just thinking about it. NeilAnd depressed is the adjective we use to describe how we are feeling. Don't feel depressed, Rob! Let's listen to Professor Brent Roberts from the University of Illinois to find out more about the benefits of talk therapy. INSERTProfessor Brent Roberts from the University of IllinoisSeeing a therapist does result in marked changes in psychological functioning. So people get less depressed and they get less anxious, and it seems to be regardless of what type of intervention is engaged in. And that is… and that has been one of the more positive aspects of the therapy research that we've seen. NeilSo when people talk to therapists about their problems, it results in marked changes in their psychological functioning – marked here means obvious or noticeable. RobAnd these marked changes are that people become less depressed and anxious! NeilAn intervention, by the way, is something you do to improve a medical problem – and in this context, it refers to different types of talk therapy. RobBut why is talking about our problems helpful, Neil? NeilI think it gives a shape to our problems. It makes them seem clearer – and that's a first step in being able to manage them. Also, "a problem shared is a problem halved", as the saying goes. RobThere's also some scientific evidence that talk therapy can change the way we think and feel – by replacing negative thought patterns with positive ones. NeilMedication can also change the way we think and feel. Some people take pills to treat depression. RobBut medication can have negative effects, for example it can make you feel sleepy during the daytime. NeilWell, here's a positive thought – let's check how much we've learned today by going over today's vocabulary! We had therapy… RobTherapy is a type of treatment for a problem or illness. There's therapy – therapist – therapeutic. NeilMy therapist is using a new therapy with me – it's very therapeutic! RobTherapeutic means 'treating an illness' – but in a more general sense, it can simply mean 'relaxing'. For example, I find listening to music very therapeutic. Neil OK. Next up – psychological – relating to the mind. Psychology – psychologist – psychological. Depression and anxiety are both psychological problems. RobMy friend is studying psychology at university. NeilI want to be a famous psychologist. RobA career change at your age, Neil?! You've kept that one a secret. OK. Number three – disturbed – 'not thinking or behaving in a normal way because you have psychological problems'. She was a disturbed young woman. NeilOr disturbing – I've been having very disturbing dreams recently. RobPoor Neil! Disturbing here means 'upsetting or worrying'. NeilNext item – depression – a feeling of unhappiness that can affect your thoughts, behaviour, and feelings. RobWe felt depressed by the news. NeilThe news was very depressing! RobAlright. Let's lift the mood – marked means 'obvious or noticeable'. There's been a marked improvement in your English homework! NeilThere was a marked increase in the company's profits last year! RobAnd finally – intervention – something you do to improve a problem – medical or otherwise. NeilLet me intervene at this point – intervene – that's the verb and in this context it means 'to interrupt' – and say we've forgotten the quiz question, Rob!! Rob Oh, no! Good intervention. Yes, let's remind ourselves of that quiz question: who invented the first talk therapy? And you said Sigmund Freud, which is the right answer, so well done, Neil! Psychoanalysis was invented in the early 1890s by Austrian neurologist Sigmund Freud. The patient lies on a couch and talks about their thoughts, feelings and dreams while the therapist listens. Psychoanalytic sessions typically last 50 minutes and take place 4 to 5 times a week. NeilOK. Good to know. But I think I prefer our own brand of talk therapy here on the show. And listeners – you can express your thoughts and feelings by visiting our Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube pages. RobTalk to you again soon! Bye bye! NeilSo tell me about your childhood, Rob…
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